60 Degrees North: Greenland

As a young girl besotted with adventurous tales of distant lands, and the child of a modern-day nomadic family, I flew over Greenland many times on my way back and forth between Europe and the US.  Each time that the weather cooperated, I would stare down at the ice sheet, cracked and heaving, punctuated with glinting aqua features, and wonder what it was really like down there.  Never did I dream I would one day walk those lands, photograph them, breathe them, hear them.  But in 2016, I did just that.

These images were taken at the Ilulissat ice fjord which is filled with massive icebergs that calve from the Sermeq Kujalleq glacier, one of the fastest moving glaciers in the world.  This place is a UNESCO world heritage site and ground zero for much of what we know today about climate change and global warning.  Elder locals spoke of times past when the harbor would freeze over each winter, but the children of Ilulissat rarely experience that today.  The warming climate is dramatically changing local conditions here, and so the children learn of what used to be...